The Grass is Always Greener

The Grass is Always Greener

I think this is my favorite resin cast fish I have done so far. The fish is a freshwater drum which I have used in quite a few pieces now. The main body, as well as the larger fins, is all part of the primary mold. The pectoral and pelvic fins are all cast separately and then later epoxied onto main body. In this image the fish is freestanding, but really the piece is meant to hang on the wall. It was just easier to photograph this way since glare in the resin, as well as shadows, are a major issue when it comes to documenting these things. The object inside is an actual dead bird, and no I did not kill it. I found it dead outside of the Marshall Sculpture Warehouse in Huntington, WV. For some reason, a lot of people assume I capture these birds live and kill them to put inside the resin. I assure you, this is not the case.

The type of bird is a European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) which is quite common around here. The idea of the piece for me is that we make parks and other “controlled” forms of nature because we love feeling as though we are a part of it. Simultaneously we are also encroaching on the natural habitats of many species. As we do this, we are destroying their homes and in turn destroying nature. I read a book about Roxy Paine while I was writing my seminar paper called Art in Earth and he had many of these same concerns. I really took to this concept and have thought about it a lot so it has inevitably revealed itself in my own work. I’m not completely positive why this is one of my favorites so far, but it probably has something to do with my fascination with dead things. That may sound morbid, but I think a lot of people have this same fascination even though they may not admit to it. I have finally found a way to display a dead animal in a way that prevents it from decaying further as well as sealing in all the smell and yucky stuff.