SynGas

SynGas

If you are familiar with the Institute chemical plant of West Virginia then you may recognize this building since it is right beside Route 25 between Dunbar and Nitro. I did change the layout a bit, but overall it is pretty much how it is in real life. This is where synthesis gas, or syngas for short, is produced. It consists of primarily hydrogen, carbon monoxide and some carbon dioxide. It can be used as a fuel source but is normally used as an ingredient in the production of other chemicals. In the case of the Institute plant it is used in the production of phosgene, which in itself is a chemical warfare agent used in the First World War. Here the phosgene is used to create Methyl Isocyanate, or MIC, which is a highly toxic ingredient used in pesticides. If you have heard of sevin dust insecticide, then you know of a product with these ingredients in it. In this painting, since all the other chemicals I talked about are far too dangerous, I used a minute amount of sevin dust mixed with my paint to add a bit more reality to the final piece of work. This painting was part of an invitational show called Midsummer Saltations in 2009 at the Art Store in Charleston, West Virginia.

This composition is different from #2 Power House by being much more slender which creates a greater vertical feeling. It is a canvas dimension you don’t often see being that tall and thin. I believe this aspect of the painting makes the composition more successful than the power house painting although I feel the paint work is better in the previous. I took a bit of a different direction in my color choices as well. I used a much more limited palette using what you may think of as drab colors. These images may be a bit deceiving because my under painting was done in bright colors and, in person, you can see these bright colors peeking out from behind the more evident somber hues. The weather in this painting is also more ominous which, in my opinion, changes the entire feel of the work. Each painting I created in this series, I experimented with different qualities to find the most successful way of presenting the subject matter since I had never done any realistic landscape paintings before. Every time I did another, I found something I felt was more successful. At the same time, I realized something else I had done previously was successful in a different way.








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